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PostSubject: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:24 am

The mobile (also called a mobile, wireless, cellular , cell , or hand (hp))[1] is a short-range, portable electronic device used for mobile voice or data communication over a network of specialized base stations known as cell sites. The first commercial mobile service was launched in Japan by NTT in 1979, and by November 2007, the total number of mobile subscriptions in the world had reached 3.3 billion, or half of the human population (although some users have multiple subscriptions, or inactive subscriptions), which also makes the mobile the most widely spread technology and the most common gadget in the world.[2] In addition to the standard voice function of a tele, current mobile s may support many additional services, and accessories, such as SMS for text messaging, email, packet switching for access to the Internet, gaming, bluetooth, infrared, camera with video recorder and MMS for sending and receiving photos and video. Most current mobile s connect to a cellular network of base stations (cell sites), which is in turn interconnected to the public switched tele network (PSTN) (the exception is satellite s). The first mobile to enable internet connectivity and wireless email use, was the Nokia Communicator released in 1996 and created a new category of expensive s called smarts. In 1999 the first mobile internet service was launched by NTT DoCoMo in Japan under the i-Mode service. By 2007 over 798 million people around the world accessed the internet or equivalent mobile internet services such as WAP and i-Mode at least occasionally using a mobile rather than a personal computer.
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PostSubject: Re: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:26 am

--Cellular systems--

Mobile s send and receive radio signals with any number of cell site base stations fitted with microwave antennas. These sites are usually mounted on a tower, pole or building, located throughout populated areas, then connected to a cabled communication network and switching system. The s have a low-power transceiver that transmits voice and data to the nearest cell sites, normally not more than 8 to 13 km (approximately 5 to 8 miles) away.

When the mobile or data device is turned on, it registers with the mobile tele exchange, or switch, with its unique identifiers, and will then be alerted by the mobile switch when there is an incoming tele call. The handset constantly listens for the strongest signal being received from the surrounding base stations. As the user moves around the network, the mobile device will "handoff" to various cell sites during calls, or while waiting (idle) between calls it will reselect cell sites.

Cell sites have relatively low-power (often only one or two watts) radio transmitters which broadcast their presence and relay communications between the mobile handsets and the switch. The switch in turn connects the call to another subscriber of the same wireless service provider or to the public tele network, which includes the networks of other wireless carriers. Many of these sites are camouflaged to blend with existing environments, particularly in scenic areas.

The dialogue between the handset and the cell site is a stream of digital data that includes digitized audio (except for the first generation analog networks). The technology that achieves this depends on the system which the mobile operator has adopted. The technologies are grouped by generation. The first-generation systems started in 1979 with Japan, are all analog and include AMPS and NMT. Second-generation systems, started in 1991 in Finland, are all digital and include GSM, CDMA and TDMA.

The nature of cellular technology renders many s vulnerable to 'cloning': anytime a cell moves out of coverage (for example, in a road tunnel), when the signal is re-established, the will send out a 're-connect' signal to the nearest cell-tower, identifying itself and signalling that it is again ready to transmit. WIth the proper equipment, it's possible to intercept the re-connect signal and encode the data it contains into a 'blank' -- in all respects, the 'blank' is then an exact duplicate of the real and any calls made on the 'clone' will be charged to the original account.

Third-generation (3G) networks, which are still being deployed, began in Japan in 2001. They are all digital, and offer high-speed data access in addition to voice services and include W-CDMA (known also as UMTS), and CDMA2000 EV-DO. China will launch a third generation technology on the TD-SCDMA standard. Operators use a mix of predesignated frequency bands determined by the network requirements and local regulations.

In an effort to limit the potential harm from having a transmitter close to the user's body, the first fixed/mobile cellular s that had a separate transmitter, vehicle-mounted antenna, and handset (known as car s and bag s) were limited to a maximum 3 watts Effective Radiated Power. Modern handheld cells which must have the transmission antenna held inches from the user's skull are limited to a maximum transmission power of 0.6 watts ERP. Regardless of the potential biological effects, the reduced transmission range of modern handheld s limits their usefulness in rural locations as compared to car/bag s, and handhelds require that cell towers be spaced much closer together to compensate for their lack of transmission power.

Some handhelds include an optional auxiliary antenna port on the back of the , which allows it to be connected to a large external antenna and a 3 watt cellular booster. Alternately in fringe-reception areas, a cellular repeater may be used, which uses a long distance high-gain dish antenna or yagi antenna to communicate with a cell tower far outside of normal range, and a repeater to rebroadcast on a small short-range local antenna that allows any cell within a few meters to function properly

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PostSubject: Re: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:27 am

--Handsets--

Nokia is currently the world's largest manufacturer of mobile s, with a global device market share of approximately 40% in 2008. Other major mobile manufacturers (in order of market share) include Samsung (14%), Motorola (14%), Sony Ericsson (9%) and LG (7%).[3] These manufacturers account for over 80% of all mobile s sold and produce s for sale in most countries.

Other manufacturers include Apple Inc., Audiovox (now UTStarcom), Benefon, BenQ-Siemens, CECT, High Tech Computer Corporation (HTC), Fujitsu, Kyocera, Mitsubishi Electric, NEC, Neonode, Panasonic (Matsushita Electric), Pantech Curitel, Philips, Research In Motion, Sagem, Sanyo, Sharp, Siemens, Sierra Wireless, SK Teletech, Sonim Technologies, T&A Alcatel, Huawei, Trium and Toshiba. There are also specialist communication systems related to (but distinct from) mobile s.

There are several categories of mobile s, from basic s to feature s such as musics and cameras, to smarts. The first smart was the Nokia 9000 Communicator in 1996 which incorporated PDA functionality to the basic mobile at the time. As miniaturization and increased processing power of microchips has enabled ever more features to be added to s, the concept of the smart has evolved, and what was a high-end smart five years ago, is a standard today. Several series have been introduced to address a given market segment, such as the RIM Blackberry focusing on enterprise/corporate customer email needs; the SonyEricsson Walkman series of musics and Cybershot series of cameras; and the Nokia N-Series of multimedia s. The Apple iPhone is another example of a multimedia smart.

Main article: Mobile features
Mobile s often have features beyond sending text messages and making voice calls, including Internet browsing, music (MP3) playback, memo recording, personal organizer functions, e-mail, instant messaging, built-in cameras and camcorders, ringtones, games, radio, Push-to-Talk (PTT), infrared and Bluetooth connectivity, call registers, ability to watch streaming video or download video for later viewing, video calling and serve as a wireless modem for a PC, and soon will also serve as a console of sorts to online games and other high quality games. The total value of mobile data services exceeds the value of paid services on the Internet, and was worth 31 billion dollars in 2006 (source Informa).[citation needed] The largest categories of mobile services are music, picture downloads, videogaming, adult entertainment, gambling, video/TV.
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PostSubject: Re: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:28 am

--Applications--

The most commonly used data application on mobile s is SMS text messaging, with 74% of all mobile users as active users (over 2.4 billion out of 3.3 billion total subscribers at the end of 2007). SMS text messaging was worth over 100 billion dollars in annual revenues in 2007 and the worldwide average of messaging use is 2.6 SMS sent per day per person across the whole mobile subscriber base. (source Informa 2007). The first SMS text message was sent from a computer to a mobile in 1992 in the UK, while the first person-to-person SMS from to was sent in Finland in 1993.

The other non-SMS data services used by mobile s were worth 31 Billion dollars in 2007, and were led by mobile music, downloadable logos and pictures, gaming, gambling, adult entertainment and advertising (source: Informa 2007). The first downloadable mobile content was sold to a mobile in Finland in 1998, when Radiolinja (now Elisa) introduced the downloadable ringing tone service. In 1999 Japanese mobile operator NTT DoCoMo introduced its mobile internet service, i-Mode, which today is the world's largest mobile internet service and roughly the same size as Google in annual revenues.

The first mobile news service, delivered via SMS, was launched in Finland in 2000. Mobile news services are expanding with many organizations providing "on-demand" news services by SMS. Some also provide "instant" news pushed out by SMS. Mobile telephony also facilitates activism and public journalism being explored by Reuters and Yahoo![4] and small independent news companies such as Jasmine News in Sri Lanka. Companies like Monster[5] are starting to offer mobile services such as job search and career advice. Consumer applications are on the rise and include everything from information guides on local activities and events to mobile coupons and discount offers one can use to save money on purchases. Even tools for creating websites for mobile s are increasingly becoming available, e.g. Mobilemo.

Mobile payments were first trialled in Finland in 1998 when two coca cola machines in Espoo were enabled to work with SMS payments. Eventually the idea spread and in 1999 the Philippines launched the first commercial mobile payments systems, on the mobile operators Globe and Smart. Today mobile payments ranging from mobile banking to mobile credit cards to mobile commerce are very widely used in Asia and Africa, and in selected European markets. For example in the Philippines it is not unusual to have your whole paycheck paid to the mobile account. In Kenya the limit of money transfers from one mobile banking account to another is one million US dollars. In India paying utility bills with mobile gains a 5% discount. In Estonia the government found criminals collecting cash parking fees, so the government declared that only mobile payments via SMS were valid for parking and today all parking fees in Estonia are handled via mobile and the crime involved in the activity has vanished.

Mobile Applications are developed using the Six M's (previously Five M's) service-development theory created by the author Tomi Ahonen with Joe Barrett of Nokia and Paul Golding of Motorola. The Six M's are Movement (location), Moment (time), Me (personalization), Multi-user (community), Money (payments) and Machines (automation). The Six M's / Five M's theory is widely referenced in the telecoms applications literature and used by most major industry players. The first book to discuss the theory was Services for UMTS by Ahonen & Barrett in 2002.

The availability of mobile backup applications is growing with the increasing amount of mobile data being stored on mobile s today. With mobile manufacturers producing mobile handsets with more and more memory storage capabilities the awareness of the importance in backing up mobile data is increasing. Corporate mobile users today keep very important company information on their mobiles, information if lost then not easily replaced. Wireless backup applications like SC BackUp offer users the chance to backup mobile data using advanced wireless technology. Users can backup, restore or transfer mobile data anytime, anywhere all over the world, to a secured server.

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PostSubject: Re: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:30 am

---Media---

The mobile became a mass media channel in 1998 when the first ringing tones were sold to mobile s by Radiolinja in Finland. Soon other media content appeared such as news, videogames, jokes, horoscopes, TV content and advertising. In 2006 the total value of mobile paid media content exceeded internet paid media content and was worth 31 Billion dollars (source Informa 2007). The value of music on s was worth 9.3 Billion dollars in 2007 and gaming was worth over 5 billion dollars in 2007 (source Netsize Guide 2008).

The mobile is often called the Fourth Screen (if counting cinema, TV and PC screens as the first three) or Third Screen (counting only TV and PC screens). It is also called the Seventh of the Mass Media (with Print, Recordings, Cinema, Radio, TV and Internet the first six). Most early content for mobile tended to be copies of legacy media, such as the banner advertisement or the TV news highlight video clip. Recently unique content for mobile has been emerging, from the ringing tones and ringback tones in music to "mobisodes" the video content that has been produced exclusively for mobile s.

The advent of media on the mobile has also produced the opportunity to identify and track Alpha Users or Hubs, the most influential members of any social community. AMF Ventures measured in 2007 the relative accuracy of three mass media, and found that audience measures on mobile were nine times more accurate than on the internet and 90 times more accurate than on TV.
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PostSubject: Re: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:31 am

---Power supply---

Mobile s generally obtain power from batteries which can be recharged from a USB port or from mains power or a cigarette lighter socket in a car using an adapter (often called battery charger or wall wart). Formerly, the most common form of mobile batteries were nickel metal-hydride, as they have a low size and weight. Lithium-Ion batteries are sometimes used, as they are lighter and do not have the voltage depression that nickel metal-hydride batteries do. Many mobile manufacturers have now switched to using lithium-Polymer batteries as opposed to the older Lithium-Ion, the main advantages of this being even lower weight and the possibility to make the battery a shape other than strict cuboid. Mobile manufacturers have been experimenting with alternate power sources, including solar cells.

In addition to the battery, most cells require a small microchip, called a Subscriber Identity Module or SIM Card, to function. Approximately the size of a one-cent postage stamp, the SIM Card is installed underneath the battery in the rear of the unit, and (when properly activated) stores the 's configuration data, and information about the itself, such as which calling plan the subscriber is using. When the subscriber removes the SIM Card, it can be re-inserted into another and used as normal.

Each SIM Card is activated by use of a unique numerical identifier; once activated, the identifier is locked down and the card is permanently locked in to the activating network. For this reason, most retailers will refuse the return of an activated SIM Card.

Those cell s that do not use a SIM Card have the data programmed in to their memory. This data is accessed by using a special digit sequence to access the "NAM" as in "Name" or number programming menu. From here, one can add information such as a new number for your , new Service Provider numbers, new emergency numbers, change their Authentication Key or A-Key code, and update their Preferred Roaming List or PRL. However, to prevent the average Joe from totally disabling their or removing it from the network, the Service Provider puts a lock on this data called a Master Subsidiary Lock or MSL.

The MSL also ensures that the Service Provider gets payment for the that was purchased or "leased". For example, the Motorola Razr V9C costs upwards of CAD $500. You can get one from Bell Mobility for approximately $200. The difference is paid by the customer in the form of a monthly bill. If, in this case, Bell Mobility did not use a MSL, then they may lose the $300$400 difference that is paid in the monthly bill, since some customers would cancel their service and take the to another carrier such as Telus, or Verizon. This would eventually put the carrier or in this case, Bell Mobility out of business.
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PostSubject: Re: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Wed Jun 11, 2008 12:35 pm

nice sharing brother
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PostSubject: Re: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Thu Jun 12, 2008 9:08 am

thanx bro.nice sharing.....
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PostSubject: Re: Most Important Information About Mobile Phone's   Sat Oct 11, 2008 9:59 am

thank u so much bro.....nice sharing...
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